Browsing Tag

US Punk

Crimson Catastrophe – Pocket Doughnut: hard, fast, and frosted punk rock

If you take your punk rock hard, fast, and frosted, take a bite out of the title single to the Baltimore-based outfit, Crimson Catastrophe’s latest album, Pocket Doughnut. Punk has always been about non-conformist defiance, which is exactly why Crimson Catastrophe went against the over-politicised punk grain with ‘Pocket Doughnut’.

Political punk will always have its place, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t plenty of room on the airwaves for bands frenetically squeezing the joy of life’s simple pleasures. Pocket Doughnut is absolutely ridiculous, yet you can’t help getting swept up in the frenetic scuzzed-up sugar rush. We can’t wait for our next fix.

Pocket Doughnut is now available to stream in full on Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

The Lost Dolls revives the radio star with their 70s punk track, ‘RadioGirl’.

Video may have killed the radio star, but she’s been revived in feminine form in the latest single, ‘RadioGirl’, from the Denver, Colorado-based alt-rock artist, The Lost Dolls. The smitten feat of sugar-coated sleaze is made infinitely sweeter with the virtuosic guitars that will win over even the most hard-to-please fans of ‘70s punk rock.

The modernity in the track comes via the nuanced 90s grunge infusion and the pop-punk edge that brings RadioGirl right into the 21st-century while evoking a fair amount of nostalgia with vintage melodies that are just as infectiously catchy as Video Called the Radio Star.

It comes as no surprise that the Lost Dolls are racking up the streams and taking America by storm with their affectionately raunchy sound since making their debut in 2020. They’re definitely ones to watch.

You can check out RadioGirl for yourselves by heading over to Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Trash n Privilege brought 80s hardcore punk back to the airwaves with The Pain I Like the Most.

Trash n Privilege reintroduced hardcore punk to the airwaves with their anthemically-charged EP, One More Round, featuring the standout stormer, ‘The Pain I Like the Most’. The intensity of the instrumental aggression is enough to give Melvins a run for their money.

The American punk outfit fronted by Steve Shepard takes plenty of influence from the Californian and DC hardcore scenes in the 80s. Lyrically, they’re even more of a visceral force to be reckoned with. The Pain I Like the Most is packed with the abrasive emotions that usually come with negative connotations, but Trash n Privilege proved how necessary they are for endurance.

With their curveball melodic breakdown that leads to a wall of punk discord before the outro in their nuanced track, Trash n Privilege succeeded in affirming that they’re one to watch. Anyone who likes to vent through music that doesn’t buy into the ironically toxic woke culture which manifests on Twitter through very different kinds of breakdowns will want them on their radar.

The Pain I Like the Most is available to stream via SoundCloud.

Review by Amelia Vandergast