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Best Folk Music Blog & Promotion

Ludwik Konopko shows us that true peace within is indeed possible with ‘All for Us’

After giving us a much-needed embrace with his previous effort ‘Up and Down‘, Ludwik Konopko returns with a superb instrumental track that might induce a merry whistle from your lips on ‘All for Us‘.

Ludwik Konopko is a Ukrainian-born Polish guitarist and composer who is known throughout the world as one of the best artists of his generation.

In 2022 Ludwik Konopko was a finalist of the 20th UK Songwriter Contest (UK), the 18th International Acoustic Music Awards (USA) and the 23rd Annual Great American Song Contest (USA). He also received a Special Mention from the jury of the International Songwriting Awards.” ~ Ludwik Konopko

Bringing us a sterling effort that shall lift your spirits up like a sail in the wind, Ludwik Konopko is at his classy best and takes us into a whole better mindset no matter what the current climates.

Ludwik Konopko had his first public appearance as a guitarist at the age of 19, when he performed in an orchestra at the Lviv National Philharmonic. In 1989 he co-created his first band Tea Fan Club (TFC), which is still considered today a legendary musical project in Ukraine.” ~ Ludwik Konopko

All for Us‘ from the esteemed Ukrainian-born Polish guitarist and composer Ludwik Konopko is such a tranquil song that might turn your frown into a smile and get you skipping a step again. Made with his signature classy style and bringing a groove that will shed the darkness away like it was yesterday’s skin, into a whole new world of possibility.

When you choose to see the glass as half full, anything is actually possible.

Hear this master unveil another gem on Spotify and see more release news via IG.

Reviewed by Llewelyn Screen

UK alt-folk sister duo māsa are at their organically natural best on the ‘Underside’

After stunning our battered hearts with their beautifully healing single, ‘My Love Went to Sea‘, from May, māsa sends us into a dreamy galaxy with their breathtaking effort, ‘Underside‘.

māsa (formerly known as Currer Bell), is a wonderful UK-based indie alt-folk duo who was created by two sisters who are intrinsically linked and make otherworldly music you can’t possibly dislike.

From an early age, siblings Faron and Merle were home-schooled, which gave them the space to create a shared imaginary world brimming with characters and scenes to fill their storytelling songs.” ~ māsa

With their debut album ‘Sailors and Insomniacs‘ set for release this month, māsa engage our consciousness wide awake with a simply scintillating display of majestic goodness via a sweet song that is spiritually rejuvenating beyond preceding degrees of comprehension.

The importance of this bond is behind the name: māsa means sister in Latvian, the language of their great-grandmother, whose extraordinary life-story and vivid imagination remain a treasured legacy for the duo.” ~ māsa

Underside‘ from UK-based indie alt-folk duo māsa, is a rather special melody that will ease your nerves and help you find that place of contentedness that we have all been searching for. They have delightfully navigated through the noise and pollution of the world to remind us that true beauty does indeed still exist.

Sung with great care and with a serene melody, it is hard to find anything purer that this delicate song in 2022.

Listen to this harmonious wonder on Spotify and see more of their travels on IG.

Reviewed by Llewelyn Screen

Kasey Butler – Love Like That: No Indie Alt-Pop Artist Has Worn Scorn Better

Kasey Butler

“You’re the darkest daydream in my mind” is one hell of an opening lyric; the poetry doesn’t falter from there on out in Kasey Butler’s latest progressive indie hit, Love Like That.

From a folky, vocally flooring intro into a fiery scorned proclamation of contempt for the people that send our orbits off-kilter to the tune of massive EDM pop beats, Love Like That is a summer stormer that just keeps on raging.

Ingraining even more gravitas, there is also a touch of theatrical piano-pop sewn into the hit around the arrestive orchestral swells. In every conceivable way, Kasey Butler constructed the perfect pop hit. It keeps you guessing; the monolithic shifts in tone and momentum happen as easily as breathing and that voice… That mindfully poised voice wrapping around the earworm choral lyric, “I know you don’t have dimension, broken heart was your intention, forgive me I was naive”. It is safe to say we are hooked.

Love Like That will officially release on June 30th. Get it in your ears via Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Orlando indie-folk singer-songwriter Faae spoke for us all in her Anthropocene-conscious single, summer song

Ahead of the release of their debut EP themed around derealization and identity in this smouldering Anthropocene, the Orlando indie-folk artist, Faae, has shared her gracefully haunting single, summer song.

In their own words, summer song is “shining a light at the end of the world”, and heartbreakingly, the lyricism gets even more profound as it explores the mental ties that get taut and tormenting when we try to make positive moves. “it is hard to be better when there is no one to account for you” is a lyric not easily forgotten.

In the style of Phoebe Bridgers, Mitski and Daughter, the instrumentals confound the expressive and vulnerable nature of single with the raw, ragged and still sublime acoustic textures that anyone with a pulse will want to surrender to. I haven’t felt this excited about Indie folk since I discovered Big Thief. And I’m pretty sure I won’t be the only one utterly captivated by Faae.

summer song will officially release on July 2nd as part of the artist’s debut EP, rudolph. Check it out on SoundCloud and follow Faae on Instagram.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Spotlight Feature: Allan Hill is profound in the indie-folk delicacy of his sophomore album, Oxford

With each single an embodiment of warmth and compassion, any indie-folk fan with a semblance of self-awareness will want to make Allan Hill’s sophomore album, Oxford, their aural home.

In the same vein as Elliott Smith, Adrianne Lenker (Big Thief), and Sufjan Stevens, the album which was officially released on June 10th, is profound in its delicacy. Consisting of little more than subtly warm synths, banjo, fingerpicked guitars and quiescently revealing vocals, the release aids just that; the release of every frustration our isolated age has imparted.

With finding resilience being an overarching theme, which ebbs through the nine-track release, by the time Goodbye Blue Monday rolls around you have a confidant in the Canadian artist.

Starting with the single, Angell Woods, which was recorded in one take in the woods, it is all too easy to ease yourself into the enveloping accordant resonance of the LP. Before track two, This Time of Year cuts to the bone with the precision of the artist’s ability to allude to weather-triggered emotion that words alone can never explain.

The sepia-tinged melodicism of the title-single allows the fact that Hill only picked up a guitar during lockdown almost unbelievable. As simple as the light production, which contrasts the heavy lyricism, may be, there’s a tenacity to the rhythm, allowing it to feel as natural as breathing.

Here is what Allan Hill had to say on his sophomore release:

“Oxford delicately documents the process of starting over and coming to terms with solitude, guilt, and inevitable change in real-time. Impermanence is a common theme. Empty stretches of highway, late night phone calls, decaying suburbs, violence, tender conversations and flora and fauna are all intertwined to create an intimate yet isolating universe.”

Hear the album on Spotify & Bandcamp. Follow Allan Hill on Instagram.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Ariana Saraha & Flight Behavior showed us the true tribal roots of folk in Grandmother’s Tears

Here to remind us of what folk music was before it was commercialised and dominated by The Lumineers is the world music album, From the Wild, from Ariana Saraha & Flight Behavior.

The opening single, Grandmother’s Tears, takes contemporary frustrative energy and stretches it back a millennia through a soundscape inspired by infinitely more than the grand sum of human construction and destruction. With each element of nature a potential muse for Ariana Saraha & Flight Behavior, it’s almost surreal that they’re of this era. After listening to the lyric “Grandmother’s tears, they have fallen. Four thousand years”, which will haunt my contemplation for quite some time, I scarcely seem rooted in 2022 myself.

Ariana Saraha & Flight Behavior’s album, From the Wild, is now available to stream on Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Allan Hill muses on impermanence in his sophomore album, Oxford

Unlike many lockdown-born projects, the Indie-folk solo artist, Allan Hill, didn’t give up the ghost when the bars opened again. After his 2021 debut, he’s revealed the delicate melancholia refined in his sophomore 2022 album, Oxford.

In his own words, the LP is a “coming of age turning inwards and an exploration of impermanence, nostalgia, isolation and queerness.” In the title single, the invitingly warm plaintive soul wraps around the simplistic admission, “everything keeps changing, and I’m fine”, which isn’t profound in itself until you start to consider the journey an artist had to go through to make that proclamation.

The fingerpicked Either/Or-era Elliott Smith reminiscences may be strong in the nature entwined single, but Hill’s autonomy as a stunningly talented artist in his own right is enough to quiescently beat them into submission.

Oxford is now available to stream on Spotify. Grab some tissues first though, yeah?

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Pat Burgess wonders if the two connected souls found the love map again on ‘A Borrowed Mandolin’

Taken off his first ever 12-track solo release called ‘The Song Box‘, Pat Burgess shows us the hard road that will be followed all the way to that ultimate love on ‘A Borrowed Mandolin‘.

Pat Burgess is a highly experienced Dublin-born, Leixlip, Ireland-based indie singer-songwriter who has been in the music scene for the past 45 years.

As the lead singer and founder member of the Irish Americana group, The Rye River Band, we find an artist who sounds in reinvigorated form with a classic single that will fill you up with a hope that is furnished with so much honesty.

In the 70s Pat performed on the live Dublin music circuit doing solo gigs and guest appearances and around this time he started writing songs.” ~ Pat Burgess

Sung with so much true introspection, Pat Burgess presents us with a real insight into life and performs with a smooth vocal ability that will have you listening so intently, like you are hearing a lesson from an underground legend.

A Borrowed Mandolin‘ from Leixlip, Ireland-based indie singer-songwriter Pat Burgess is a trip down memory lane and a guiding light into what is needed to truly find that light again if you have lost it.

This is a storyteller’s delight and if you love music with a genuine message from someone who has truly lived, this will be a song you shall have on repeat for ages.

Listen up to this timeless sounding single on YouTube and see more news on his website.

Reviewed by Llewelyn Screen

Romance is a form of fatalism in The County Affair’s latest slice of Americana, Beach

Following their 2021 debut album, which was recorded at Abbey Road and sold 100,000 digital copies, the UK-residing Americana duo, The County Affair, unveiled their latest single, Beach (Summer Mix).

In their own words, Beach is about love and a car crash, some may say they’re two of the same, but there is nothing quite like the old-school crooning country melodies entwining with the lyrical fatalism in the subversively blissful single.

With the bends of the bluesy guitar notes carrying as much poise as Swan Lake, the sepia-tinged single went beyond paying ode to the roots of Americana. The duo created a romantic reminiscence of nostalgia before driving it through their cinematically choral sonic signature. It leaves no room to wonder why The County Affair has been lauded on both sides of the pond.

Beach will officially release on June 17th via X&Y Records. Hear it for yourselves here.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

 

 

David Wakeling looks into the future of this dystopia in ‘Living at 45 Degrees’

With the melancholy of The Verve in their best years, the folky narrative introspection of Bob Dylan and psychedelic layers not all too far removed from the kaleidoscopic textures from The Legendary Pink Dots, David Wakeling’s seminal single, Living at 45 Degrees, hits a plethora of spots.

The Anthropocene-conscious single only runs on par with Amanda Palmer’s Drowning in the Sound in terms of the wit in the metaphors, which cleverly shine a light on the ridiculous state that humanity has shaped itself into.

It’s tracks like Living at 45 Degrees which truly prove the worth of music in society. It’s something for the minority of humans that are self-aware enough to see into the futility of existence to meld into and find reason within.

The official video for Living at 45 Degrees is now available to stream via YouTube.

Review by Amelia Vandergast