Browsing Tag

grunge

Francis Botcherby brought the Seattle sound to morally bankrupt British shores with ‘Parliament of Wolves’

Francis Botcherby

Cambridge, UK-based alt solo artist, Francis Botcherby, has been honing in on his sound for over a decade; his music has featured on BBC Cambridgeshire amongst many stations. His most popular music video to date has racked up over 100,000 streams, and he has counted plenty of other successes in between.

His latest single, Parliament of Wolves, carries the same protestive lyrical edge as Billy Bragg, but stylistically, Botcherby brought the sound of Seattle to UK shores. With bassline growls that will evoke nostalgia for Soundgarden’s grungy licks and enigmatic vocals that carry a touch of the Mike Patton magic, there’s a fair amount of nostalgia but there is something incredibly refreshing about his shimmering guitars and grooving rhythms that throw further back to the days when Hendrix reigned supreme.

Francis Botcherby’s single Parliament of Wolves was officially released on December 3rd. You can check it out for yourselves via SoundCloud.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

KillerMiracle has released their grungy acoustic rock ballad, Dreamcatcher.

For any fans of Soul Asylum’s pensive side, KillerMiracle’s acoustic rock ballad Dreamcatcher is a must-experience sonic slice of raw emotion. The easy acoustic guitar chords paired with the hard melancholy is an intoxicatingly cathartic mix.

The mournful lyricism is served through hazily scorned whiskey-soaked vocals against the almost cinematic instrumental score that goes far beyond your average rugged and rough rock ballad. There’s so much poise within the intensity of Dreamcatcher; KillerMiracle’s matured songwriting style is a breath of fresh air on the airwaves. We can’t wait to hear how he follows on from this bitter-sweet sophomore release.

Dreamcatcher was officially released on November 25th. You can check it out yourselves by heading over to SoundCloud.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Ger Lane indoctrinates us in ‘The New Revolution in Love’ in his stadium-worthy alt-rock track

Irish-born, London-based Avant Rock artist Ger Lane’s seminal single, The New Revolution in Love, carries enough soul to remind you that you’ve got one of your very own. While the lyrics prise affection, the instrumentals submerge you in a sonorous pool of psych-tinged, shoegazey alt-rock.

The sultry psychotropic track is an obsession-worthy nostalgia trip that will instantly transfix any alt 90s fans. Right from the intro, Zane Scott’s drums arrest your rhythmic pulses with the caustic hits that create visceral friction against the effect-laden angular guitars. With vocals as captivating in their stridency as Chris Cornell’s, abject apathy isn’t an option once you hit play, which may sound hyperbolic in our age of ennui, but if anyone can deliver aural salvation; it is Ger Lane.

As for Tim Bazell’s production, Kevin Shields couldn’t have pulled The New Revolution in Love together better. It should be a paradox for a single soundscape to unravel as visceral and hypnotic simultaneously, but the stadium-ready hit did just that and plenty more. It is enough to make Arcade Fire sound flat and pedestrian.

Check out The New Revolution in Love, featuring the London Brazilian Choir for yourselves by heading over to SoundCloud.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

 

Superbloom stripped back the vintage fuzz to deliver a heartfelt semi-orchestral version of their hit single, Paper & Stone.

After the successful release of their shoegaze-tinged alt 90s track, Paper & Stone, Superbloom released the unexpected but intensely appreciated semi-orchestral acoustic version.

They’ve left the high-octane fuzz by the wayside in the unplugged version to give their intellectual lyrics even more room to breathe in the cinematic track that highlights the impassioned conviction that pours into their expression. It wouldn’t be a stretch to say that the acoustic version of Paper & Stone rivals Corey Taylor’s solo work. Superbloom will only be rated highly enough when they’re topping the alt music charts.

The collective of artists, fronted by North London’s Robert James and Sam Lidington, works alongside producer  Ed Sokolowski. I can’t speak for everyone, but as someone who has never quite gotten over the 90s, you couldn’t ask for a better mix of revival nostalgia and intellectual aural autonomy.

Paper & Stone is due for official release on November 5th. You can check out the official video via YouTube.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Inside My Mind: Unwanted Guest flushes out the unwelcome ‘Unwanted Guest’ on debut project

After deciding to get that rainy day music to the awaiting world as his band took an enforced break due to the horrific pandemic of 2020/2021, Unwanted Guest drops a new song that means so much for a man who has always wanted to release his own music as he shows his likable passion on ‘Unwanted Guest‘.

Unwanted Guest is a Dave Fox-created 90’s influenced indie Rock/Metal/ Grunge project. Dave is known throughout the UK for his work as the highly regarded guitarist for well-respected Barnsley Rock band Seventh Son.

UK’s leading mental health charity MIND has been carefully chosen by Dave and his loving wife to receive any sales from this record, as this vitally important organization helped them both during some dark times. With a kind gesture like this, we find an inspired artist who sounds so fresh and extra motivated to help a team who means so much to him peronally.

This is a well-performed track all about getting rid of that sketchy shadow which feels like is angrily clawing away at your mind, when you just want to succeed and be happy in life. Sung with a forceful but never overbearing style, there are so many ravashing riffs to enjoy on this sizzling effort from a truly talented artist.

Unwanted Guest‘ from the Barnsley indie Rock/Metal/Grunge solo artist Dave Fox aka Unwanted Guest, shudders the speakers and shakes off this pesky voice which is doing nothing to help you in life. The claws are out like a wild cat but the motivation to dust this away from your fragile skin is there – as we are brought into a mind that is strong – and ready for anything.

This is the type of track to put on loud when you are feeling that you need to break away from what is holding you back, as you take a deep breath and remember that your mental health is so vitally important to long-term happiness. A vital message indeed, which needs to be heard far and wide.

Hear this electrifying new single on Spotify and see more news via the FB.

Reviewed by Llewelyn Screen

Manchester’s most Machiavellian outfit, The Battery Farm, is set to release their sophomore EP, Dirty Den’s March of Suffering.

If Rob Zombie dreamt up a band to feature in his horror flicks, I am pretty sure there would be a fair amount of hypothetical reminiscence to the mischievously intellectual Manchester-based outfit, The Battery Farm, who are set to release their second boundary-breaking EP Dirty Den’s March of Suffering.

The addictively dynamic release permits you to feel pretty much every emotion on the human spectrum. Given that slipping out of ennui enough to get excited by new music isn’t exactly an easy feat when our worldviews become even bleaker with every log onto social media and flick onto the news, that speaks volumes.

Beyond the sheer sonic innovation, the genius in The Battery Farm lies in their ability to appeal to the melancholically inclined with their satirically liberating tracks that make having an IQ higher than a loaf of bread fleetingly worth it.

Their exposition on the dankness of the human condition in Dirty Den’s March of Suffering cuts just as close to the bone as The Manic Street Preachers’ The Holy Bible. The parallels with the Manics don’t end there either; notably, they carry the same scathingly sharp lyrical wit as Edwards.

After an ominously distorted Westworld-style honkytonk prelude that disquietly teases the carnage that follows, the EP volleys you into the tumultuous ride with When the Whip Goes Crack which pulls pure veracious poetry out of squalor and indignity. If you thought Ken Loach’s films were hard-hitting, prepare for the bruises imparted by this juggernaut of an alt-rock release that lends from everything from post-hardcore to grunge.

I’ve Never Been to Gorton proves that The Battery Farm can do light-hearted just as well as they can lay down inflamed perception-shifting introspection. Behind the bouncy vocals is an exhibition of the modestly virtuosic talent of guitarist, Dominic Corry. While you get cheap kicks of hearing about the landscapes that you have lamented about being around, you are left mesmerised by the guitar licks that stylistically sit between Marr and Glen Branca.

The Battery Farm may have been lazily lumped into the generic punk category for their previous releases, but they come out all experimental guns blazing with Drowning in Black. The darkly psychedelic release is easily one of the most authentically experimental soundscapes conceived in Manchester in the last two decades.

Roy Keane isn’t Real is a bruiser of a scuzzed-up attack on the stupidity and conspiracy theories that have been sending everyone under recently. If any single proves their commitment to delving deep into their Machiavellian imagination, it’s this punk-rooted track grounded in their working-class charisma.

The concluding single, We’re at the Top, ends the EP on an ethereal, jarringly stunning note. It fittingly becomes the swan song of the EP that encompasses life, death and everything between with infinitely more cerebral finesse than Good Charlotte mustered in The Chronicles of Life and Death. With a similar sonic palette to Jerry & the Peacemakers and vocal reminiscence to Mike Patton’s crooning on Mr Bungle’s California album, it arrests you into reflection while conceptually imparting the disarming assurance that our mortal coil is ephemeral. Ingeniously, We’re at the Top tempts you away from spending your days fixated on the ugliness in the world with the same ‘we’re all going to die so fucking be nice’ gravitas as In Heaven by Pixies.

In their own words, here is the concept behind the Dirty Den’s March of Suffering:

“This EP is an attempt by us to celebrate the humanity behind the moment of death. It’s a celebration of the foibles and fallibility of people, a speculation on the silly and mundane things we may get caught up in in death as we do in life – trips to Gorton never made, conspiracy theories chased forever, all kinds of irrelevant nonsense. It’s an acknowledgement too of the blitzkrieg of fear that must be the moment of death, regardless of how it comes, and the ultimate loneliness that is the destiny of all of us. Regardless of circumstance, death is the most innately lonely thing of all and as such it is innately terrifying. The EP is also a futile attempt to understand how something so gigantic can be so unknowable. None of us know what it is like to die, and just as your humble working boiz are doing here, we can all only speculate.”

The EP is due for release on October 15th, 2021; it will be available to stream and purchase on all major platforms. Physical copies are available for via their website.

Tickets for the EP launch at Gulliver’s in Manchester on October 16th are available here.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Noise Blossom – Louderage: The Sophomore Grunge Album No Alt-90s Fan Should Ignore

The popularity of alt-rock may have been in decline since the 90s, but the level of talent runs parallel through artists such as Noise Blossom. Ahead of the release of their sophomore album, Louderage, we’ve delved into the standout single, SAD.

Right from the prelude the echo of the grunge era grips you. Amidst the nods to Alice in Chains, Soundgarden and Nirvana, Noise Blossom diversifies their sonic palette with Metallica-reminiscent instrumental tones and doomy vocals that will undoubtedly resonate with anyone whose mentality errs on the side of melancholy. In 2021, I am assuming that is everyone.

The official video for SAD premiered on September 17th; you can check it out for yourselves via YouTube.

Check out Noise Blossom on their official website.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Your Lies: Dundee alt-rock artist Frances Gein knows that someday she will be fine on break-up track ‘Mud’

As she bravely crawls away from the past relationship that ended so traumatically, Frances Gein wades through the darkness to find her light again on the terrific new single ‘Mud‘.

Frances Gein is an inspiring LGBTQ+ alternative rock/pop artist from Dundee, Scotland. She blends topics about mental health, loneliness, and existential dread into her music creations, as she aims to mix grunge and beauty together.

She began learning guitar at the start of the lockdown in 2020 to deal with personal trauma but fell in love with the art of song writing.” ~ Frances Gein

With a gritty and honest flow streaming genuinely withing her veins, she leads us into this heartbreaking story of being with someone who selfishly just wanted to take away your energy all for themselves. Without truly caring for you – they showed you their true intentions eventually – that let you away from that toxic web of doom, so you could heal up to love properly like you truly deserve and smell that romantic perfume.

Inspired by the poetry of William Wordsworth, ‘Mud’ looks back at abusive relationship with a sarcastic tone.” ~ Frances Gein

Mud‘ from the talented Scottish alt-rock/pop solo artist Frances Gein, is the story of knowing that sometime in the future you will be okay. Right now however, you are still steaming with the vivid memory of not being loved properly by a former lover who let you down badly. She sings with a real maturity and takes us on a movie-like journey through the mess that you didn’t want to endure, but certainly learnt from.

Sometimes you have to be at your absolute lowest, to reach the exciting highs that will complete your hungry soul.

Hear this new single via the Spotify music channel and see more on her IG.

Reviewed by Llewelyn Screen

Feel the frustration in Left of the Slash’s latest hard-rock hit, The Time is Now

Left of the Slash

Left of the Slash are the harbingers of doom in their latest single, The Time is Now, which uses screeching sleaze rock solos around the trepidation-laden rhythm section. In the vocals, you’ll find a sense of urgency for awakening that becomes infectious throughout the high-octane hard-rock hit.

Left of the Slash is easily one of the most promising alt-rock outfits to have fallen on our radar this year. Their expansive array of influence covers everyone from TOOL to The Yeah Yeah Yeahs to Black Sabbath to Pixies; which gives you an idea of how they came to cultivate such a dynamic sound that is unpredictable from one release to the next.

You can check out Left of the Slash on YouTube, Facebook and Instagram.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Metrophobia chase ghosts in their Alt-90s inspired single, How Long

https://www.metrophobia.net/pictures/silent_treatment_800.jpg

If Metrophobia’s 2021 debut album, Silent Treatment, was marketed as a lost relic from the alt-90s, I’m fairly sure that no one would raise an eyebrow. The best introduction to their sonic palate that amalgamates shoegaze, noise, indie and grunge is the nostalgically ethereal single, How Long.

Around the catchy hooks, the tender vocals fall into the discord that spills from the scuzzed-up over-driven guitars, allowing you to see a softer side to the discontent How Long was inspired by.

The two forming members of Metrophobia met in Geneva, Switzerland; they worked on various projects together before turning their attention to their bitter-sweet cocktail of alt culture that will be a hit with fans of Pixies, Dinosaur Jr, Teenage Fanclub and Sebadoh.

Metrophobia’s debut album is now available to stream on Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast