Browsing Tag

Soundtrack

Discover your new metaphysical playlist staple with Basil Babychan’s ambient composition. Phantasm

Hans Zimmer fans will want to delve into the latest composition by Indo-Dutch artist Basil Babychan which extends his mission to create music from the soul for the soul; the concept behind the neo-classic ambient composition, Phantasm, is a lesson in philosophy. In his own words;

“Coping mechanisms are often subject to debate and scrutiny. They improve mental and emotional well-being by addressing anxiety, depression, and other mental health concerns, derived from painful real-life events. In many cases, one makes conscious or unconscious choices that enhances control over behaviour or gives psychological comfort by creating an alternate reality. Fantasy and Reality often overlap. We need Fantasy to survive our Reality.”

Phantasm unravels as the perfect soundscape to embrace our true reality, in all of its infinite metaphysical possibility and beauty. In the prelude, the intricate keys start tentatively ascending, as more layers amass in the meditatively textured single; Phantasm becomes a transcendental experience that reminds you, we’re all just energy constrained by our vision of a 4D reality.

Phantasm is due for official release on October 29th; you can check it out for yourselves via SoundCloud.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

The award-winning orchestral rock composer Aldo has released his latest cinematic score, Stem the Tide.

There has been an influx of ambient and easy listening music on the airwaves in 2021; it took the talent of pianist, composer and songwriter, Aldo to prove what difference a prodigal touch to a soundscape can make.

His latest progressively orchestral, rock-tinged single, Stem the Tide, starts around ambient piano melodies and flourishes of Celtic culture; even when the momentum starts to build, the sublime tonal bliss goes untarnished. The Emmy award-winners scores have been on countless TV shows and documentaries. He has still found the time to release six albums, all of them containing the same panoramic flair that he is accoladed for in the film and TV music industry. If any artist has the ability to redefine your perception of talent, it is Aldo.

Stem the Tide is now available to stream on Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

OSLU sets a sophisticated cinematic score in Goodbye Old Friend.

Jazz fusionist and soundtrack composer OSLU released their latest album, Explaudere, on October 1st. By taking modern film scores and classical music as inspiration, the neo-blues pioneer orchestrates accessible soundscapes that tenderly bind you into the ease of the progressions and the cinematic flair.

The instrumental single, Goodbye Old Friend, uses clean-cut blues guitars, shimmering crescendos and nuanced rock elements to testify to OSLU’s ingenuity when it comes to creating orchestral catharsis. It would be no surprise to see OSLU’s name on a Blockbuster’s roll of end credits. The sheer talent is enough to allow you to question everything you heard on the radio today.

Listen to OSLU’s latest album on SoundCloud.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

 

Sonophonix have released their alternative orchestral bond theme, No Time To Die.

To correspond with the new 2021 Bond film, the breaking classical duo Sonophonix have release their ethereal spin on Billie Eilish’s theme song, No Time to Die.

With Eilish’s rendition becoming the most haunting Bond theme to have ever existed, it was hard to see how more intrinsic beauty could be pulled from the minimalist score. Yet, Sonophonix discernibly succeeded by amplifying the intensity of the soundtrack with far more prominent orchestral strings and a more cinematically sinister edge. I wouldn’t have raised an eyebrow if I was told the composition was Ramin Djawadi’s work.

You can stream No Time to Die for yourselves on Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Revel in the petrichor with Lian Kyla’s standout piano composition, After Rain

Lian Kyla

Revel in the petrichor with After Rain, the standout single from producer and composer Lian Kyla’s debut EP, Dream Maker. Each soundscape is an expression of creativity and emotion from the Philippines-based singer-songwriter, producer and author whose work resounds as much on the airwaves as it does onscreen.

The captivating progressions blossom in the tranquil release that introduces you to the artist’s unique neo-classical flair which she carves out through minimalist minor-key notes and delicate orchestral swells. The score brings you closer to nature without you ever having to leave your living room. At the risk of sounding hyperbolic, it has the feel of a modern masterpiece.

Dream Maker is now available to stream in full via SoundCloud. Connect with the artist via Facebook & Instagram.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Orchestral composer Tony Manfredonia leaves us breathless with ‘Midnight’

Michigan-based composer and orchestrator Tony Manfredonia has released his Lost at Sea EP, featuring the modern masterpiece, Midnight. Even if you’re accustomed to listening to intense OSTs, Midnight is enough to leave you feeling like Alex in the infamous Clockwork Orange aversion therapy scene.

Tony Manfredonia spreads his talent between composing and orchestrating for video games, concert halls and the airwaves. His ability to command aural alchemy through colourful orchestration and emotionally charged narratives has allowed the artist to tour the globe with the Apollo Chamber Players, the Washington Metropolitan Gamer Symphony Orchestra and the University of Cambridge Concert Band.

Like all of his pieces, Midnight is enough to challenge your existing perception of talent. The sheer ethereal artistry pulsating through this orchestral piece is enough to trigger your emotional responses; when you throw in the expression of passion in this striking score, you’ll be left breathless.

Midnight is now available to stream via Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

The Acme Corporation present their sublime musical take on T. S. Eliot’s He Do the Police in Different Voices.

He Do the Police in Different Voices by Stephen Nunns

‘He Do the Police in Different Voices’ is the stellar album-musical adapted from T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land by composer, theatre director and co-founder of the Acme Corporation, Stephen Nunns.

For those previously unacquainted with Eliot’s iconic ground-breaking work, He Do the Police in Different voices explores T. S. Eliot’s rocky relationship with his wife, Vivian.

The jazzy noir pop single, A Handful of Dust, brings Eliot’s fiery account of frustrated passion to life with the finesse that you’d expect from an accolade-decorated Broadway director. O’Malley Steuerman’s sultry vocal timbre holds no prisoner while resonating through perfect pitch over the instrumental arrangement where synths, electric sitar, and lap steel notes bring a gritty atmosphere synonymous with the beat generation. Ironically, Nunns emanated the air that Eliot was always considered too grandiose for.

He Do the Police in Different Voices is now available to stream and purchase via Bandcamp.

For more info, visit The Acme Corporation website.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Janae Genna takes us ‘Down the Creek’ with her artful folk single featuring Alex Johnston.

Janae Genna

Down the Creek is the latest single to be released by the conceptually expressive singer-songwriter Janae Genna, featuring vocals from Alex Johnston. It was co-written by Janae Genna and Justin Brittain as part of the score for the film, Here Now. The accordant lullaby starts archetypally before the folksy single takes on an eerier tone, progressing almost in the same way as the cult-hit folk film Midsommar – before all the gore.`

Janae Genna’s and Alex Johnston’s layered harmonies give the otherwise minimalist soundscape a panoramically dynamic feel but as the single gears towards the outro, an uneasiness nestles into the release. The sense of anticipation it leaves you with could only be described as immense. You come to expect an ending akin to Nick Cave’s Where the Wild Roses Grow, you’re left with a foreboding unknown.

Check out Janae Genna on Instagram and YouTube.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Thomas Eggensberger explores the ‘Forgotten Universe’ in his latest cinematic score.

LA-based German composer, orchestrator and songwriter Thomas Eggensberger has composed for film, television, concert music and collaborative art; his accolades are endless and his latest score, ‘Forgotten Universe’, is sure to earn him plenty more.

Forgotten Universe exhibits all of the hallmarks of talent that you would expect from an artist that has toured globally and worked with high-profile names, including Wayne Sharp, Tom Howe and plenty more. But the emotion that bleeds from the wavering orchestral strings in the cinematically profound instrumental score is anything but predictable. The composer made light work of ensuring that by the time you reach the end of this bitter-sweet serenade, your rhythmic pulses will feel at a loss with the silence that follows.

Forgotten Universe is now available to stream via YouTube.

Connect with Thomas Eggensberger via Facebook and Instagram.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Andi Reisner – dark espionage with ‘Die Zwei Brüder’

Soundtrax by Andi Reisner

Composer Andi Reisner was born in Köln in Germany in 1960, and currently has over forty television and movie soundtrack pieces to his name, alongside his founding-membership of new music ensemble Ugly Culture.

With ‘Die Zwei Brüder’, he’s delivered a powerful, disturbing instrumental neo-classical work which evokes images of film noir, monochrome spy thrillers, all rain-soaked streets and cold-war double-dealings. Dark, brooding, Bauhaus-inspired, and filled with impending-doom, echoing and sparse then fierce, distorted and upfront, Die Zwei Brüder – from Reisner’s ‘Soundtrax’ album – is potent, unsettling, challenging, and totally captivating. Inspired, disconcerting, stimulating, and provocative, ‘Die Zwei Brüder’ is quite simply an epic piece of instrumental noir.

You can hear Andi Reisner’s ‘Soundtrax’ album on BandCamp; check out Andi Reisner’s website here.

Review by Alex Holmes