Browsing Tag

Musical

The Acme Corporation present their sublime musical take on T. S. Eliot’s He Do the Police in Different Voices.

He Do the Police in Different Voices by Stephen Nunns

‘He Do the Police in Different Voices’ is the stellar album-musical adapted from T. S. Eliot’s The Waste Land by composer, theatre director and co-founder of the Acme Corporation, Stephen Nunns.

For those previously unacquainted with Eliot’s iconic ground-breaking work, He Do the Police in Different voices explores T. S. Eliot’s rocky relationship with his wife, Vivian.

The jazzy noir pop single, A Handful of Dust, brings Eliot’s fiery account of frustrated passion to life with the finesse that you’d expect from an accolade-decorated Broadway director. O’Malley Steuerman’s sultry vocal timbre holds no prisoner while resonating through perfect pitch over the instrumental arrangement where synths, electric sitar, and lap steel notes bring a gritty atmosphere synonymous with the beat generation. Ironically, Nunns emanated the air that Eliot was always considered too grandiose for.

He Do the Police in Different Voices is now available to stream and purchase via Bandcamp.

For more info, visit The Acme Corporation website.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

OCEANS OF TEARS told the ultimate redemption story with ‘IF LOOKS COULD KILL’

It certainly isn’t every day that you get to enjoy an empowering redemption story through rock n roll, but thanks to OCEANS OF TEARS’ rock musical ‘DROWNED IN A SEA OF TEARS’, you’ll get to enjoy theatrical intensity alongside glam rock riffs and supercharged synths. Especially in the standout single ‘IF LOOKS COULD KILL’.

With dirty rhythms coalescing with dancey beats that wouldn’t be out of place on a 90s dance workout tape, IF LOOKS COULD KILL is a sonic trip down the sunset strip with a side serving of adrenalizing lyricism which acts as a reminder that you’re stronger than you know.

The official video to IF LOOKS COULD KILL is now available to stream via YouTube.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Musical theater flair immersed in pop: Allison St. Rock makes the debut anthem of 2020 with ‘I Wanna Feel Better’

Allison St. Rock urges us to stay positive no matter what on the purposeful indie pop single ‘I Wanna Feel Better‘.

Allison St. Rock is a Stonington, Connecticut-born composer, playwright, performer and new singer-songwriter, who has just blessed us with her debut single and this is a new track filled with tasty treats for our ears. This is a true creative, a proudly LBGT woman who has a voice that will leave you so breathless, you will need CPR immediately.

“You know that feeling when you hear a song, and it describes exactly how you’re feeling in the moment, it makes you feel seen and makes you feel less alone? That’s what I want to give with my music.”- Allison St. Rock

This is the rebirth after a breakup that has sucked all your energy away and you have decided you want to make a change. The time is now and dancing all the pain away seems to be the way to go. Instead of hiding away and feeling sorry for yourself, the way to be better is to take a deep breath, and get in your own zone again.

Her classy voice is soothing and fresh like a tasty orange on a hot day, the juices of her energy rub off on you and you start to feel happier already. The electro-pop beat keeps you on your toes and this is such a catchy song you should tie yourself to a tree so you can hold on. This is the start of an exciting journey for a creative that seems ready and is confident in her abilities to do whatever she sets her mind to.

I Wanna Feel Better‘ from New York City’s Allison St. Rock is a virtual big hug to anyone out there that has been struggling with lost love. She is the compass to find yourself again and move on to new adventures that enables you to love wholeheartedly again.

Get out of your slump and hear this sparkling song on Spotify. See her social life via IG and FB.

Reviewed by Llewelyn Screen

Premiere: James W Howard is set to make their debut with their cabaret-inspired Rock Pop single “Twirling The Rosé”

By drawing from everything from Musical Theatre to Classic Rock to Pop, James W Howard has created an eccentrically uplifting track with his debut single Twirling The Rosé.

Queen fans will definitely be enamoured by the theatrical soundscape which is led by infectiously melodic honky-tonk piano and infused with nuances of Psych Pop and Rock. Adding even more jaunty appeal to the single are James W Howard’s vocals which stand as a testament to his talent as a natural performer.

It’s safe to say that I haven’t heard any new artist offering the same kind of contagiously euphoric exuberance as what you’ll find when you hit play on Twirling The Rosé.

You’ll have to wait a little longer before you can check out James W Howard’s indulgently upbeat sound for yourselves. In the meantime, you can head over to Facebook, Soundcloud and Instagram and keep up to date with news of future releases.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Unshackle Yourselves from Gender Stereotypes with Stacy Gabel’s latest Country Pop Single

Stacy Gabel

Femininity is hard. I’m still not entirely sure how to do it properly. But I do know that there’s plenty of resonance to be found in Stacy Gabel’s empowering upcoming single “High Heeled Shoes”. Especially for anyone who doesn’t particularly feel like bowing to gender normativity.

With Abba-style chorus vocals and Stacy Gabel’s accessible personality injected into the conversational verses, High Heeled Shoes is a work of unforgettable Indie Pop musical theatre. The instrumental arrangement is equally as eccentric with strings and the mandolin alongside the acoustic guitar in the Cabaret-Esque soundscape.

High Heeled Shoes basically offers the same mood-boost as watching your favourite musical – just without the time commitment. Make it a playlist essential.

You’ll be able to check out Stacy Gabel’s single High Heeled Shoes from February 21st, 2020. In the meantime, you can get a taste of her uplifting approach to Country Pop by heading over to Soundcloud and checking out her earlier releases.

Review by Amelia Vandergast