Browsing Category

Alternative

The alt-rock originator, djamesk13, struck again with his grungy proto-punk single, And That’s Where It Ends, And So It All Begun

And That’s Where It Ends, And So It All Begun” is the latest tonally sublime single released by the London-based alt-rock originator djamesk13 (David Kemp).

If Dinosaur Jr veered away from grunge and towards proto-punk and made a pit stop at 90s Britpop to pick up a bit of extra guitar swagger, the sonic result would be in a similar vein to this nostalgically produced hit.

The distortedly and poetically orchestrated single provides a definitive discourse on the nature of our lives which runs through like pre-determined chapters of destiny. Lament it or live it to the max, but that’s the nature of being, captured in the lyrical hooks in this epitomisingly sludgy earworm.

And That’s Where It Ends, And So It All Begun was officially released on November 19th. Catch it on SoundCloud.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Wacko Fest presents: “This Is Fine.”

Wacko Fest is a project with a truly one-of-a-kind sound and style. What makes the artistry of this musical act so special is that it all started in a very serendipitous way, just from friends having fun and jamming together. The spontaneity at the heart of Wack Fest is still a huge and vital component of this release and a really good example of why their formula is so exciting and always connects with people. Wacko Fest’s most recent work, “This Is Fine,” drops on November 25th, 2022. This is a great introduction to the band’s music and a fantastic example of the broad scope that fuels its artistic endeavours overall.

This release is highly recommended to fans of jangly, melodic and energetic indie rock.

Find out more about Wack Fest: http://www.wackofest.com/

Freak out with the anthemically resonant single, Trauma, from the Atlanta indie powerhouse, yin.

Discussing inter-generational trauma no longer has to be confined to the therapy sessions you can’t afford, and posting statuses online that will result in a cascade of patronising care reacts. Atlanta’s most relatable alt-indie three-piece, yin, is here to make sure of it with their latest single, Trauma.

The infectiously maniacal high energy lets you ride the rare peaks that intersect the depth of the isolated lows. Strap yourselves in for the most anthemic indie jangle pop guitars you’ve ever heard as they sail through the dynamism that brings Take on Me to mind with the eccentrically soaring climactic choruses that leave the 1975 and Bleachers in the archetypal dirt.

In the style of Yung Blud, yin pair euphonic sonics with dark lyrics that make no bones about alluding to the dark places we drift into and all of the even darker thoughts that keep us company during the bouts of anxious madness that late-stage capitalism has left us to linger in. With their debut LP, Someone Who Isn’t Me, set to release on November 22nd, all eyes and ears should be on yin right now.

“There’s something really wonderful and terrible about being human in the modern age. We’re all struggling with the mere fact that waking up and convincing ourselves that we don’t hate each other is normal, and there’s always this emotional and spiritual push to try and love and cherish the little that we have to call our own. We just want to be honest about all of the sad parts as well as the really amazing happy parts.”

Trauma is now available to stream on Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Joe Astley sings the everyman blues in his world-class single, Suburbia

Joe Astley

Drawing parallels between Bitter Sweet Symphony, sans the bitterness, Joe Astley’s orchestral feat of folkish rock, Suburbia, taken from his forthcoming debut album, is for anyone who has ever felt the gravity of their hometown dragging them down more insidiously than anywhere else.

The opening lyric, “this city’s got it in for me, there’s a thousand other places that I wish to be”, delivered through harmonic lines that soak the record with sepia-tinged lament as they resound over the rugged acoustic guitar chords, orchestral strings and soaring electric guitar notes as they wind old school Americana into the release starts the single on a sombre note.

The profoundly uplifting release seamlessly progresses into a defiantly strident score through the refusal to fade away into the misery that soaks the streets of working-class towns and cities across the UK. The Wigan-based professional singer-songwriter and instrumentalist sonically attested to the bleakness scribed in Orwell’s The Road to Wigan Pier while simultaneously pulling beauty from the destitution that his accoladed career is pulling him from.

As some artists bemoan the current climate of the music industry, Joe Astley is thriving as definitive proof that with the right balance of tenacious songwriting, insurmountable talent and effortless charisma that immerses you into the emotional states he orchestrates, success is still in the sightline.

Between his residency at the Cavern Club, SKY TV streaming the live run-through of Suburbia, his debut EP on the shelves in HMV, and all his singles charting in the iTunes top ten, it’s impossible not to feel giddy when anticipating his next move.

The launch of his debut album, Twenty-First Century Times, on January 20th, 2023 will undoubtedly open up even more roads for Astley as he takes his boy-next-door resonance wherever he goes.

Purchase Suburbia on Apple Music or add it to your Spotify playlists.

Follow Joe Astley on Facebook & Instagram.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Go down the downward spiral with Daniel Antonio’s dark electronic rock debut, everything I touch

Any fans of Blue October, Celldweller, and Three Days Grace will be gripped with the evocative raw candour that complements the turbulently dark electronic rock aesthetic in Daniel Antonio’s debut single, everything I touch.

For infectious appeal, the debut fuses pop hooks with glitchy electronica and down-tuned guitars. With the bilingual lyrics adding yet another repeat-worthy facet to the track that exhibits Antonio’s fearless vulnerability equally through the lyrics and vocals, every time you listen to everything I touch, the immense sensory experience becomes that little bit more visceral. The single was written to encapsulate a relatable dark downward spiral that made losing touch an inevitability and admirably as an admission of fallibility.

Away from the music industry, the Sheffield-based solo artist starred in the BAFTA-nominated film Everybody’s Talking About Jamie – which explains the colossal cinematic touches in his debut. He also provided backing vocals for Ed Sheeran & Bring Me the Horizon’s earworm, Bad Habits, which hit number 3 on the UK charts. If this single doesn’t chart too, I might start a riot on his behalf.

Everything I touch will be available to stream from November 25th. Catch it on SoundCloud.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Autoleisureland Interview: Showing us what fresh experience sounds like on Infiniti Drive

Opening up the cupboard and slicing us some tasty 80s nostalgia to nibble on, the excellent UK act Autoleisureland sat down with A&R Factory to delve into about all things Infiniti Drive and more. Honest and insightful, we’re even bigger fans now and unconditionally love their late career resurgence while doing what they love.

We appreciate you taking the time to chat with us today Autoleisureland. Firstly, please guide our loyal readers deep inside where your new music creation is currently based and who is involved in the project?

Autoleisureland: Hi, we’re Autoleisureland and we’re based between Sunderland and Newcastle, two cities in the North East of England. We’re a duo, comprising of Paul Woods, vocals, and multi-instrumentalist David Brewis. In a previous life, we were two founding members of The Kane Gang, a successful and critically acclaimed indie soul band.

Let’s swerve into your upcoming debut album Infiniti Drive, can we? What was the vision around the release and process to get the sound you both desired?

Autoleisureland: I suppose it started a few years ago when Dave was working on his instrumental album. Every week before we popped out for a beer, he’d drop off a new mix or new track. I really liked them and started on lyrics for some of them. I started giving him lyrics and ideas for new songs. Eventually, we came up with the song Autoleisureland and that was the catalyst for the sound we were going for in our heads. Stylish, sophisti-pop, sort of all our influences coming together. After that we never stopped, songs just kept on coming. We are what you could call music veterans and we never thought we’d be doing a late-career thing, but we felt it was so good and fresh, we had to put it out there.

How is the music scene doing in your local area and do you feel like live music is 100% back or not yet?

Autoleisureland: We’re no experts anymore, but it seems to be making a very slow recovery. I think it’s going to be hit again shortly with the UK recession looming.

When you close your eyes and imagine playing inside a packed stadium live with screaming fans aplenty, what does it feel like?

Autoleisureland: A long time ago, packed venues and a little less screaming. Sadly, nowadays I probably wouldn’t go to a place with that many people. Also, Autoleisureland so far is strictly a recording project. We’re in a hurry to get so much out there, before even considering live work.

If you could open for any band currently performing live, who would it be and why?

Autoleisureland: Dave suggested Hall & Oates as back in the day we had a planned tour with them cancelled, so it would be nice to have a dream fulfilled. For me, Poolside plays some interesting gigs – beautiful Mexican coastal venues and Californian wineries. I could go for that.

What do you think the music industry in the UK and worldwide needs more of?

Autoleisureland: More streaming payments for music creators should be a priority. Musicians should be fairly paid for their creations. People pay for food, chocolate bars, and beer, so why not music? I’ve worked in newspapers and music, two products that people expect to have for nothing. You can bet when that happens, the products will in time become devalued. When you have so much free music, for instance, that you have not invested in, you won’t even invest your time in it. Hence, usually a one-minute cut-off time on songs on streaming platforms. Sorry, I’m on my soapbox.

Infiniti Drive is ready to be loved on Spotify. Find out more about these well-chiselled gents on Facebook.

Interview by Llewelyn Screen

Captain Lo-Fi reached the serotonin-spilling pinnacle of feel-good music with his genre-fluid hit, ‘Joker’

With eccentrically sweet vocals that will instantaneously steal the hearts of any Modest Mouse and Grandaddy fans over some of the most genre-fluid instrumentals that you have ever heard, Captain Lo-Fi’s seminal single, Joker, is almost tear-jerkingly sweet.

The Germany-hailing musician and producer has been fine-tuning his sound in his own studio since 2013, working with artists from various genres and producing beats for artists and companies, including Loopmasters.

This goes a fair way in explaining the organic ease of the experimentalism in Joker, which throws all sense of pretence to the wayside to deliver funky, indie hip-hop-meets-pop instrumentals that his sunny-side-up vocals drift above. Creating authentically ‘feel-good’ music is no easy feat, but Captain Lo-Fi’s willingness to let his endearingly pure soul spill across his productions allowed him to reach the serotonin-spilling pinnacle.

Stream Joker on Spotify and follow Captain Lo-Fi on Instagram.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

Paper White and the Lake goes for baroque in their single, My Love, ft. Teresa Ann & Nicole Limle

For their standout single, My Love, the up-and-coming Avant-Garde originator Paper White and the Lake collaborated with Teresa Ann & Nicole Limle to create a striking piano-led score that will easily arrest any Evelyn-Evelyn and the Legendary Pink Dots fans.

The theatrically baroque piano keys and Brian Viglione-style percussion fuse in absolute synergy with the beguile of the art-house chanteuse vocals, which implant aching amorous soul into the soundscape that resonates with a touch of coldness and isolation.

My Love efficaciously proves that nothing can rival the presence of love, and nothing can be as inhospitable as a world without it. To say that you will feel all of the emotion as My Love unfurls around the reprise of “you don’t want my love” is far from a mascara-ruining understatement.

Stream My Love on YouTube.

Review by Amelia Vandergast

WD-HAN matched the chaos of the universe in their raucously seductive feat of electrifying indie rock n roll, Straight Lines

WD-HAN

Rock n’ Roll provocateurs WD-HAN are in lascivious form in their latest single, Straight Lines. After an Arctic Monkeys-Esque intro, Straight Lines quickly evolves into a blisteringly hot indie rock renegade of a track, full of raucous swagger, seductive vocal lines and riffs that will sucker-punch you into sonic submission.

WD-HAN has scintillated us with every release since they appeared on our radar in 2019 with their single, Spaceman. With a sound ever-evolving yet never veering from what makes them so viscerally raw yet tightly finessed, if you haven’t got them on your radars yet, what are you even doing with your lives?

Straight Lines throws away any sense of existentialism. While so many of us doomscroll on Twitter to justify living in fear and stagnation, WD-HAN proves that you can still be a force to be reckoned with and match the chaos of the universe.

After dominating the Floridian rock n roll scene, WD-HAN has recently relocated to LA, where they’re set to make their mark after opening for the likes of Paramore, Walk the Moon, Silversun Pickups and Kaleo.

Straight Lines will officially release on November 18th. Hear it on Spotify.

Review by Amelia Vandergast
.